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Shaw, Howard Van Doren (1869-1926) | Lake Forest College Archives and Special Collections

Name: Shaw, Howard Van Doren (1869-1926)
Variant Name: Shaw, Howard


Historical Note:

AIA Gold Medalist architect, 1926, Howard Van Doren Shaw, 1869-1926, was born in Chicago, Illinois.  He attended Chicago's Harvard School, then went to Yale University (B.A. 1890), New Haven CT,  and MIT (Archit.,1891), Boston, MA. 

Returning from Boston, he worked in the office of Paris-trained Chicago architect W.L.B. Jenney on 1893 World's columbian Exposition work and then in 1893 went into private practice. 

His practice was built around his Chicago, Midwest, and Yale business and elite social ties, for commercial and manufacturing buildings, city homes (most notably in Hyde park near the U. of Chicago), and country places especially in Lake Forest.  Other country place work is found in Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, and Ohio. 

In his middle-sized office in downtown

Chicago Shaw employed many young architects who went on to have notable careers on their own, most spectacularly David Adler (ca. 1910-12), but also Robert Work (1897-1917), Stanley D. Anderson (1919-25), Bertrand Weber, and then later after Shaw's 1926 death Ralph Milman and others.

Shaw's interest in planning is found most notably in Lake forest where he developed farms as estate neighborhoods and at least one middle-class support neighborhood (West Park, 1907).  He also designed Market Square, 1912-17, with the first plan (Town Market) completed in December 1912 while David Adler still was on his staff.  The final plan was completed in 1915 in the same style but with significant alterations in the plan and its features -- a new approach.  In 1916 he began the plan for Campus Circle faculty housing, Middle Campus, Lake Forest college, with the four initial homes his design.  This was followed in 1917 by Marktown, a planned community in East Chicago, Indiana, for Clayton Mark, Lake forest, for whom he had already designed a lakefront home.

His own summer place in Lake Forest was Ragdale, 1898, part of his first development on North Green Bay Road, begun in 1897, the first full season after the Onwentsia club was launched further south.  Today this is the headquarters of the Ragdale Foundation and is owned by the City of Lake Forest.

Notable Chicago projects include the tall Mentor Building, State Street; the 1890s and 1910s R. r. Donnelley & Sons plants on the south side; the Quadrangle Club, U. of Chicago; and the parish house of the Fourth Presbyterian Church, North Michigan Ave.  He also did two Lake Shore Drive coop apartment buildings for his North Shore country house clients, for their winters in town.   

Sources:

Cohen, Stuart and Susan Benjamin.  North Shore Chicago:  Houses of the Lakefront Suburbs, 1890-1940. 

Coventry, Kim, Daniel Meyer, and Arthur H. Miller.  Classic Country Estates of Lake Forest, Architecture and landscape Design: 1856-1940.  New York: W.W. Norton, 2003. 

Greene, Virginia A.  The Architecture of Howard Van Doren Shaw.  Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 1998.

Miller, Arthur H. and Shirley M. Paddock.  Lake Forest: Estates, People and Culture. Chicago: Arcadia, 2000.

Sources:

Cohen, Stuart and Susan Benjamin.  North Shore Chicago:  Houses of the Lakefront Suburbs, 1890-1940. 

Coventry, Kim, Daniel Meyer, and Arthur H. Miller.  Classic Country Estates of Lake Forest, Architecture and landscape Design: 1856-1940.  New York: W.W. Norton, 2003. 

Greene, Virginia A.  The Architecture of Howard Van Doren Shaw.  Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 1998.

Miller, Arthur H. and Shirley M. Paddock.  Lake Forest: Estates, People and Culture. Chicago: Arcadia, 2000.

Note Author: Arthur H. Miller, Archivist and Librarian for Special Collections, amiller@lakeforest.edu





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